BWM Architects

De Suche Menu
Revo München
Revo München
Revo München
Revo München
Revo München
Revo München
Revo München
Revo München
Revo München
Revo München
Revo München

Living whichever way you please – alone, together, for one night only, or for several months at a time. BWM Architekten have developed an interior concept for the new hotel chain Revo that follows the principle of “free flow”. This principle infuses not only the spaces themselves but also their utilisation.

“The two-floor lobby – which includes the reception, lounge, bar, restaurant and shop, as well as a co-working area – is an open space that merges living, recreation and work,” says Erich Bernard of BWM Architekten. The setting has a vintage flair, thanks to such so-called found objects as fleamarket-sourced secretary desks in combination with Vitra’s classic Fauteuil Direction Pivotant swivel chair. The 600+ guest rooms in this 16-floor building, which was designed by Delugan Meissl, are divided into four themes, each with its own colour scheme, choice of materials, furniture and lighting – but always in alignment with the free flow principle.

Erich Bernard
The two-floor lobby – which includes the reception, lounge, bar, restaurant and shop, as well as a co-working area – is an open space that merges living, recreation and work.
Erich Bernard

Long-stay concept with various room categories

“This is a long-stay concept that meets guests’ different needs,” explains Marlene Gesierich, BWM Architekten. “The rooms are divided into four categories, each one characterised by a different theme.” These categories are: sleeping, working, living and hybrid. The respective theme comes through in the design and in the fixtures and fittings. The bed in the “working” rooms, for instance, has a high headboard that splits the space into a sleeping and a working area. At the same time, a secretary desk affixed to the back of the headboard can be used as a workspace. “There is a kitchenette and a minibar in the rooms in this category,” Marlene Gesierich adds, “while the rooms in the ‘living’ category have a significantly larger kitchen area.”

The lounge area in the rooms with the “living” theme includes a small secretary desk along the wall. The “sleeping” rooms, on the other hand, minimise the work and living areas in order to maximise the sleeping area, although they do also have a kitchenette and a minibar. The fourth category is a hybrid that combines all three of the other categories. This means that sleeping, living and working are treated equally and take up approximately the same amount of space. In addition, the rooms in this category that are located on the first and sixth floors have a second level that creates a separate space for sleeping.

Although the colour schemes of the different room categories vary, they are all muted, multi-layered and have different focuses, says Gesierich. The tone of the colour schemes, which are characterised by a retro feel, is set by the kitchen areas. The carpeted hallways and wood-like walls and doors also reflect the specific colour scheme used.

Co-working area with garden and vintage flair

The design of the 270 sqm common area on the ground floor takes a different approach. Its exposed-concrete walls and columns immediately catch the eye. Different floor surfaces define the various zones, such as the inlaid parquet floor that marks the restaurant and bar area. Mesh curtains in modern, vibrant colours allow guests to create private booths of sorts that are perfect for meetings. The indoor greenery evokes a garden atmosphere and extends out into the courtyard, which contains a Zen garden. An idiosyncratic collection of “found objects” like chairs, armchairs and tables establishes a vintage flair, while the Relumine table lamp designed by mischer'traxler adds a modern touch.

A wide, freestanding staircase leads up to an entresol that also features work and meeting booths like on the ground floor. While the floor is largely covered with beige carpet tiles, mud-green linoleum sets the meeting “islands” and the coffee zone apart. The guidance system that directs guests through the building uses a clear, legible typewriter font.

The restaurant on the ground floor, named The Italian Canteen, can seat 80 guests. It offers all-day dining, serving mainly Italian dishes, including Neapolitan pizza. Two wide doors lead from the restaurant out to the al fresco dining area. Two other common areas and services offered by the hotel are a gym and a quiet garden with abundant greenery in the courtyard.

Task
Interior design for the new Revo hotel concept in Munich, including common areas and more than 600 guest rooms

Status
Completion 11/2022

Client
SWI Schimpel & Winter Projektbau GmbH

BWM Team
Erich Bernard, Marlene Gesierich, Markus Flägner, Marlies Klauser, Nadine Elisabeth Albenberger, Ismail Berkel, Michele Sabini

Image credit
Fotos: Revo München
Renderings: BWM Architekten

Participants

Architekt Interior Design
BWM Architekten

Work planning
Weickenmeier Kunz & Partner

Light planning
BWM Architekten in Kooperation mit Pokorny Lichtarchitektur

Carpet design
Gabriele Bruner

Press

28 September 2022

tophotel.de

Revo startet in München

Link PDF

23 September 2022

DEAL Magazin | Real Estate, Investment, Finance

Revo München: Hotel-Living-Konzept kommt nach München

Link PDF

5 March 2020

hotelbau.de

Erstes R.evo eröffnet 2021 in Polen

PDF